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Ending Viral Disease

We’re developing recombinant proteins to target virally infected cells

Our Work

Currently there are relatively few antiviral therapeutics and most with disadvantages. We have developed a new broad-spectrum antiviral approach with the potential to be effective for numerous clinical and priority viruses.

What's New

We are excited to announce that we have signed an exclusive license agreement for US patent 7566694, “Anti-Pathogen Treatments,” which is the one and only remaining active patent related to Todd Rider’s original DRACO work. This gives us an excellent IP foundation for work with our compound in the United States.

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Help us end viral disease! You could be part of making a big impact in the development of a much needed antiviral solution. Your support is needed and is very much appreciated.

Development of a new broad-spectrum antiviral drug

Kimer Med is a post-seed biotech start-up, located in Nelson, New Zealand, developing a new broad-spectrum antiviral drug. The compound, which we call VTose, is a derivative of DRACO, which was tested and found effective in vitro against 15 different viruses in 11 tissue types, and against Influenza H1N1 in mice.

Antivirals are an indispensable tool to deal with viral disease

The harm to human life caused by pathogenic viruses, historically and currently, is on an enormous scale. Historically, viruses such as smallpox killed hundreds of millions, perhaps over 300 million as late as the 20th century. The polio virus paralyzed over 15,000 annually. The 1918 flu pandemic killed upwards of 100 million.

Read more about our work on addressing this age old problem.

Articles

Why now? Why us? Why “VTose”? How long? How much?

There are a few questions that seem to come up with almost every extended conversation about Kimer Med and what we're doing. This isn't meant to be an investor disclosure…

Join our Forum

Read and contribute to our efforts on ending viral disease. Talk with our co-founders, other professionals and interested parties about the development of our new broad-spectrum antiviral drug.

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